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  • Changes in fermentation and animal performance during recovery from classical diet-induced milk fat depression using corn with differing rates of starch degradability.

Changes in fermentation and animal performance during recovery from classical diet-induced milk fat depression using corn with differing rates of starch degradability.

Journal of dairy science (2019-04-15)
L E Koch, T C Jenkins, W C Bridges, B M Koch, G J Lascano
ABSTRACT

Diet-induced milk fat depression (MFD) is a multifactorial disorder that can be triggered by a variety of conditions. Feeding high amounts of starch and unsaturated fatty acids has been shown to reduce milk fat yield and composition, as well as alter ruminal biohydrogenation patterns. However, little is known about how starch degradability in the rumen influences recovery from diet-induced MFD and if production of milk fat-inhibiting isomers will persist following an episode of MFD. The objective of this study was to evaluate production performance and ruminal fermentation in cows recovering from MFD when corn with a low or high starch degradability is fed. Six ruminally fistulated Holstein cows were used in a crossover design with 2 periods. During each period, MFD was induced for 10 d by feeding a diet with low fiber, high starch, and high unsaturated fatty acid. The polyunsaturated fatty acid concentration of the diet during the induction phase was modified primarily through inclusion of soybean oil. Following induction, cows were switched to either a high degradable starch recovery diet (HDS) or a low degradable starch recovery diet (LDS) for 18 d. The 7-h starch degradability was 66.5% for LDS and 87.8% for HDS. Milk was collected every 3 d for component and fatty acid analysis. On d 0, 4, 7, 10, 16, 22, and 28 of each period, ruminal pH and rumen fluid were collected every 2 h. Milk fat yield and composition was reduced during MFD induction and progressively increased by day in both HDS and LDS during recovery. Dry matter intake was similar among treatments and increased steadily over time during recovery. Preformed fatty acids were greater for HDS-fed animals, and de novo fatty acid in milk fat was greater for LDS-fed animals. Milk trans-10 C18:1 tended to be greater for HDS, and trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid was significantly greater for HDS. cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid was not affected by starch degradability during recovery. Total volatile fatty acids, butyrate, and valerate tended to differ or differed with recovery treatment, but ruminal pH and ammonia concentration were unaffected. The HDS diet responded similarly to the LDS diet during recovery with regard to milk fat percentage, but milk and fat yield tended to consistently be lower in HDS. When considering approaches to ameliorate diet-induced MFD, the degradability of the starch within rations should be evaluated. Although animal performance was similar, some trans fatty acid isomers were persistent in the milk through the recovery phase with HDS-fed animals, suggesting that milk fat synthesis might be potentially inhibited and biohydrogenation pathways modified in the rumen following an episode of MFD.

MATERIALS
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Supelco
Bacterial Acid Methyl Ester (BAME) Mix, solution (10 mg/mL total concentration in methyl caproate), analytical standard