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HomeWebinarsDon’t Feed the Trolls – Crazy Powders and Electrostatic Charge in Continuous Manufacturing

Don’t Feed the Trolls – Crazy Powders and Electrostatic Charge in Continuous Manufacturing



WEBINAR

Powder feeding is crucial for a robust continuous manufacturing (CM) operation and product quality. Even with modern gravimetric feeders, this can be a crossroad for CM as different powders interact distinctively with given equipment. Due to the complex nature of powders, their behavior needs to be considered in a multivariate manner.

In this webinar, we identify sources of feeding problems and present a set of experiments with a wide range of excipient powders and extract critical material attributes for successful feeding. We will show how feeding may alter powders, specifically their electrostatic charge. Finally, we will present the effect of relative humidity (RH) on charge and related powder adhesion.

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • Why feeding is highly relevant for continuous manufacturing
  • How powder properties affect feeding performance
  • Which feeding-induced alterations to powder properties may occur
  • How relative humidity affects electrostatic charging and material adhesion

Speakers

Theresa Hörmann-Kincses

Theresa Hörmann-Kincses

Merck

Senior Scientist, Process and Manufacturing Science Research Center for Pharmaceutical Engineering (RCPE)

Theresa did a Ph.D. in chemical engineering, working on the development of a continuous process line for the tableting of hot-melt extruded pellets. Her main activities at RCPE remained in continuous manufacturing, with a focus on process development and the investigation of material attribute effects on the processability of powders.

Michela Beretta

Michela Beretta

Merck

Scientist, Process and Manufacturing Science Research Center for Pharmaceutical Engineering (RCPE)

Michela Beretta is a Ph.D. student in chemical engineering. Her research started at RCPE in the development of controlled drug release systems and is currently focused on the field of material science for continuous manufacturing.